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Reader Poll

Have you ever visited a store and seen pictures of past shoplifters displayed behind the counter? Or perhaps you’ve seen a clip of security footage shared online in the hopes of identifying the criminals portrayed?

Publicly-shaming shoplifters is not necessarily new, but ethical concerns have been raised since the sharing of security footage of an alleged theif in Newfoundland.

Related: Questions raised over retailers who shame shoplifters with photos

Donovan Molloy, N.L.’s provincial privacy commissioner, states that store owners should bring this type of evidence to the police, rather than posting it on social media or elsewhere online. In this instance, the alleged perp was caught after robbing a sex store, but a debate has spurred about the legality of sharing images from security footage that implicate people in crimes.

So we want to know what you think, are you in favour of publicly-shaming alleged theives? Or do you think this is a matter for the police, not the public?


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