Penticton’s then and now captured in photographs and quilts

Penticton City Hall through the years as interpreted by photographer Jeff Carroll. (Submitted)Penticton City Hall through the years as interpreted by photographer Jeff Carroll. (Submitted)
Nothing says Penticton like floating down the channel. Fun in the Sun quilt by Dianne Birnie. (Submitted)Nothing says Penticton like floating down the channel. Fun in the Sun quilt by Dianne Birnie. (Submitted)
A quilt depicting the front of The Book Shop on Main Street made by Gisella Carroll. (Submitted)A quilt depicting the front of The Book Shop on Main Street made by Gisella Carroll. (Submitted)
Yesterday and today of the Naramata Inn by Julie Ferguson is featured in the Penticton Art Gallery’s newest exhibit celebrating Penticton and area landmarks. (Submitted)Yesterday and today of the Naramata Inn by Julie Ferguson is featured in the Penticton Art Gallery’s newest exhibit celebrating Penticton and area landmarks. (Submitted)

View Penticton’s landmarks over time through the lens of the Penticton Photography Club and the textiles of the Penticton Quilters’ Guild – Artsy Girls at a brand new exhibit at the Penticton Art Gallery.

In celebration of British Columbia’s 150th birthday, the two organizations have joined forces to feature 11 prominent landmarks in Penticton and the surrounding area through their artwork now displayed at the gallery. The exhibition is called Penticton: A Progression in Time and will be showing until Nov. 6.

Their goal is to provide visitors and residents with a connection to Penticton and its rich history. Not only can you view their interpretation of these landmarks but you will go away with a walking tour map to help you discover these physical places at your own leisure.

This is the photography club’s first exhibition and they are thrilled to have their work hanging on the walls of the gallery for everyone to see.

“This exhibit was a year in the making for our club. It’s very exciting and validating to see our work displayed in the gallery,” said photographer Julie Ferguson. “Some landmarks have interesting stories to tell. Penticton has a rich history.”

Some of the landmarks featured are the city hall, which has changed three times so far and is on the city’s list to change again. There is also Front Street, the Leir House, Ellis Ranch, the oxbows, and some landmarks that don’t exist anymore like the Nicola Inn on Lakeshore Drive and the CP Station.

READ MORE: Penticton council looks at replacing aging buildings

The exhibition focuses on how these locations have changed since the founding of Penticton in 1892.

Historical photographs are paired with new photographs.

Ferguson chose the Naramata Inn which hasn’t changed physically in all these years, she points out.

“It was a bit of a challenge because the outside hasn’t changed. I found my inspiration from researching the Inn and all its history at the Naramata museum,” she said.

The fibre artworks bring texture into the show, with one piece depicting people floating down the channel and another recreates the front of the Book Shop on Main Street.

“I was absolutely gobsmacked to learn what beautiful art quilts can be hanging on the wall,” said Ferguson. “This is a real treat to have these fibre artworks in the show.”

Quilter Gisela Carroll has created an amazing piece of Penticton history in recreating the front of The Book Shop on Main Street.

“I have been quilting since 1992 and have done many quilts,” said Carroll. “This quilt was done as part of a challenge that I participated in with the Artsy Girls.”

With its incredible detail, it only took Carroll a week to complete her Book Shop quilt.

“I chose this location because my husband worked there and we have known the Stevensons for at least 40 years.”

The Penticton Photography Club formed in 2008 and is a small but enthusiastic group of photographers The club’s objective is to encourage all aspects of photography by providing a forum where issues, techniques, equipment, and interests relating to photography can be freely shared and discussed.

The Artsy Girls is a special interest group of fibre artists within the Penticton Quilters’ Guild. The group was formed in 2016 and is led by Dianne Birnie.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.


 

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