Temperatures climb this week

Temperatures in the Okanagan and Shuswap could hit 36 C this week.

As widespread smoke continues to fill the valley, so do the high temperatures.

In the Central, South and North Okanagan, the mercury will hover around 31 C for Tuesday— while in the Shuswap it will be slightly cooler at 29 C.

As the week carries on temperatures will steadily begin to climb.

The smoke is expected linger in the valley for several days as no strong winds are anticipated. According to Environment Canada there is currently a ridge of high pressure over the Interior creating a stagnant air mass.

RELATED: Smoke blankets the Okanagan

Meteorologist, Alyssa Charbonneau says there is not a lot of movement in the coming days that will flush the smoke out of the province.

“Winds could shift in certain ares but it probably won’t clear the smoke out, we aren’t anticipating strong enough winds,” she explains.

Thursday will be the high for the week at 36 C as temperatures slowly drop to the mid-to-low 30 C as the weekend approaches.

However, Charbonneau says while temperatures will peak on Thursday it will not be record breaking.

“The smoke is also quiet thick and that helps to reflect some of the heat, keeping the area cool. Just like clouds.”

Meaning it may not feel like 36 C on Thursday, but instead a few degrees cooler.

The heat wave hitting the Okanagan will affect the entire province, causing concern for wildfire officials.

August is typically the BC Wildfire Services’ busiest months and the heat is anticipate to continue for several more weeks.

RELATED: B.C. wildfire crews prepare for scorching August

Next week will be somewhat cooler than this week with temperatures sitting in the low 30s C, but as Charbonneau explains it will not be a major cool down.

“The dryness in the province is expected to continue for sometime,” she says.

For those who work outdoors during the summer months WorkSafeBC is altering employees and employers of the risk of heat stress which can lead to injuries from heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

RELATED: Hot weather a risk for workers

In the Central Okanagan region, there were 17 accepted claims for heat stress-related injuries from 2007–2016.