Doctors

Maria Ezzati advertised cosmetic procedures including Botox injections on her website. (Screen capture/www.staybeautiful.info)

Metro Vancouver woman receives jail sentence for performing illegal Botox injections

Maria Ezzati has also been ordered to pay $15,000 by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of B.C.

 

Ponderosa Primary Care Centre in Penticton is considered a model for care clinics going forward by the South Okanagan Division of Family Practice. (Monique Tamminga)

Primary Care Clinic funding could be a cure for South Okanagan Similkameen doctor shortage

Ponderosa Primary Care Centre in Penticton is a model for future care clinics and doctor recruitment

 

A large illuminated heart was installed on the roof of the Vernon Jubilee Hospital May 1, 2020 but has been missing since a storm damaged the feature. (VJH Foundation photo)

Storm breaks North Okanagan hospital’s heart

White glowing heart sustained damage in wind storm

 

The UBC Okanagan South Family Medicine Residency program is one of the partnerships that the Division of Family Practice works with to encourage doctors to move to the region. The South Okanagan Similkameen has a growing shortage of doctors. (File)

Hospital district decision not the end for clinic funding chances

Interior Health will be presenting projects that need funding to the district board on Jan. 21

The UBC Okanagan South Family Medicine Residency program is one of the partnerships that the Division of Family Practice works with to encourage doctors to move to the region. The South Okanagan Similkameen has a growing shortage of doctors. (File)
A large illuminated heart was installed on the roof of the Vernon Jubilee Hospital May 1, 2020. (VJH Foundation photo)

North Okanagan hospital’s white heart beating into the new year

New feature added to the LED white heart in tribute to essential workers during the pandemic

A large illuminated heart was installed on the roof of the Vernon Jubilee Hospital May 1, 2020. (VJH Foundation photo)
An impromptu memorial for Dr. Walter Reynolds, who died after he was attacked in an examination room rests outside the Village Mall walk-in clinic in Red Deer, Alta., Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020. A man accused of killing a family doctor at a medical clinic in central Alberta is scheduled back in court today after a 30 day psychiatric exam. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Psychiatric exam finds man accused of murdering Alberta doctor fit to stand trial

Deng Mabiour, 54, is charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of Dr. Walter Reynolds

An impromptu memorial for Dr. Walter Reynolds, who died after he was attacked in an examination room rests outside the Village Mall walk-in clinic in Red Deer, Alta., Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020. A man accused of killing a family doctor at a medical clinic in central Alberta is scheduled back in court today after a 30 day psychiatric exam. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Healthcare workers and family members hold up phones as they attend a vigil for Dr. Walter Reynolds, a 45-year-old father of two, who was killed at a walk-in clinic earlier this week, in Red Deer, Alta., Friday, Aug. 14, 2020.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Alberta doctors want safer workplace after killing of physician in Red Deer clinic

Dr. Walter Reynolds, a 45-year-old father of two, was attacked by a patient wielding a weapon

Healthcare workers and family members hold up phones as they attend a vigil for Dr. Walter Reynolds, a 45-year-old father of two, who was killed at a walk-in clinic earlier this week, in Red Deer, Alta., Friday, Aug. 14, 2020.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2018 file photo, a nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Doctors brace for viral overload between cold and flu season and COVID-19

COVID-19 testing centres could be overloaded this winter as symptoms can be similar between the three illnesses

FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2018 file photo, a nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Personal protective equipment is seen in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at St. Paul’s hospital in downtown Vancouver, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. A recent survey by the Canadian Medical Association found most doctors who responded have not seen an improvement in the supply of personal protective equipment in the last month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Canadian doctors say they see little progress on improving PPE supply: survey

42 per cent had seen no change in the supply of gear such as masks and face shields in the last month,

Personal protective equipment is seen in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at St. Paul’s hospital in downtown Vancouver, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. A recent survey by the Canadian Medical Association found most doctors who responded have not seen an improvement in the supply of personal protective equipment in the last month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Salmon Arm’s Dr. Fiona McLellan, part of the Shuswap’s palliative care team, suggests people consider having a conversation with loved ones about advanced care planning, what would be important to them at end of life. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)

Shuswap doctor suggests ways to best talk about making end-of-life plans

Physician emphasizes it’s not about doom and gloom, but making use of time at home

Salmon Arm’s Dr. Fiona McLellan, part of the Shuswap’s palliative care team, suggests people consider having a conversation with loved ones about advanced care planning, what would be important to them at end of life. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)
This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the spherical particles of the new coronavirus, colorized blue, from the first U.S. case of COVID-19. The Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians is calling on its doctors to protect the limited supply of certain sedatives and pain killers needed to ventilate patients. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah A. Bullock, Azaibi Tamin/CDC via AP

Emergency doctors urged to avoid drugs used to ventilate COVID-19 patients

The association warned Canada’s shortage could become critical in weeks

This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the spherical particles of the new coronavirus, colorized blue, from the first U.S. case of COVID-19. The Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians is calling on its doctors to protect the limited supply of certain sedatives and pain killers needed to ventilate patients. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah A. Bullock, Azaibi Tamin/CDC via AP
Shuswap residents respond to health workers’ need for personal protective equipment

Shuswap residents respond to health workers’ need for personal protective equipment

Shuswap North Okanagan Division of Family Practice appeals to public for donations

Shuswap residents respond to health workers’ need for personal protective equipment
Under B.C. regulations, only licensed health professionals who are registered with the college can administer Botox. (Pixabay photo)

Unlicensed practitioner hosted ‘Botox and filler party’ despite court order: B.C. regulator

Maria Ezzati was allegedly administering cosmetic medical injectables to three different people for cash

Under B.C. regulations, only licensed health professionals who are registered with the college can administer Botox. (Pixabay photo)
Local MLAs say the introduction of a high-income tax in B.C. could deter family physicians from settling in the South Okanagan. (Black Press file photo)

High-income tax bracket could deter doctors from settling in South Okanagan, say MLAs

Local MLAs say the introduction of a high-income tax in B.C. could…

Local MLAs say the introduction of a high-income tax in B.C. could deter family physicians from settling in the South Okanagan. (Black Press file photo)
Dr. Brent Jim, from the tiny village of Witset, B.C., is the first Indigenous gynecologic oncologist in the country. (Contributed photo)

Wet’suwet’en man becomes only Indigenous gynecologic oncologist in Canada

Dr. Brent Jim is working toward improving cervical cancer screening rates for Indigenous women

Dr. Brent Jim, from the tiny village of Witset, B.C., is the first Indigenous gynecologic oncologist in the country. (Contributed photo)