EDITORIAL: This is our election

It is up to the voting public to identify the issues in the upcoming federal election

The upcoming federal election on Oct. 21 is an opportunity for Canadian voters to choose which candidates they want to represent them in Ottawa.

This is our election. It is our opportunity to choose our government

In the days and weeks leading up to the election, Canada’s political parties and numerous special interest groups are working to set the priorities and determine the issues in this election.

Some are presenting platforms. Others are addressing the past performances of leaders or candidates. And some are presenting topics they believe should be at the forefront of voters’ minds on election day.

READ ALSO: Central Okanagan candidates speak about seniors issues OAS, CPP

READ ALSO: Major parties rallying around telecom pricing issue as election nears

The result is a lot of information for voters.

Comparing the options available and selecting the best choice can be a daunting task.

But it is not up to parties or special interest groups to determine the priorities or issues. It is up to the voters.

This is our election.

It is a time to identify what is important to us, and which candidate is best able to address our concerns.

Some of the concerns may be large-scale items such as an approach to immigration, a strategy on international trade, economic policies, a party’s stance on abortion, the SNC-Lavalin affair or similar issues.

At the same time, there are also local concerns to address, such as how a candidate would, if elected, ensure the specific needs of the riding are addressed.

In the end, this election must be about what the voters want and how the candidates and parties will respond to these wishes.

If there is a topic of concern to you, discuss it with the candidates and listen to what they have to say.

Consider their party’s past voting record or policy statements.

And then cast your vote, based on the factors that are important to you.

This is our election. We determine the issues.

— Black Press

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news@summerlandreview.com
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