The dogs and puppies seized from the property included Labrador retrievers, Dalmatians, Corgis, Great Pyrenees, King Charles spaniels, Yorkies, Maltese, Poodles and Australian cattle dogs. Photo SPCA

SPCA refuses to return seized animals to Princeton area breeder

Review board finds owner liable for $250k in society costs

A Princeton woman at the centre of a large-scale animal abuse investigation attempted, and failed, to have nearly 100 animals returned to her care in November.

Janet Foulds appealed to the BC Farm Industry Review Board after 97 animals including horses, dogs and cats were seized by the BC SPCA on Sept. 23.

Foulds claimed the animals removed from her farm, on Old Hedley Road, were not in distress.

However in a 55-page decision that followed a two-day hearing with 11 witnesses, the presiding review board member wrote; “After having the benefit of reviewing the veterinary reports, I feel that to describe the seized animals as ‘healthy’ is akin to comparing the COVID pandemic to a mild flu.”

The panel heard Foulds has a long history of conflict with the SPCA, including more than 40 complaints regarding animals in her care since 2006.

READ MORE: Horses seized near Princeton suffered cruelly: BC SPCA

According to the decision, in 2015, the society seized 34 dogs, 16 horses and six cats from Foulds, as they met the definition of distress.

The board ordered that the surviving cats, dogs and horses – several puppies died of parvo virus and five horses had to be euthanized – be left in the society’s care. The decision stated the society is permitted, in its discretion, to destroy, sell, or otherwise dispose of the animals.

The surviving and recovered horses were recently put up for adoption.

READ MORE: Costs climb to more than $100K for BC SPCA to care for animals in Princeton farm seizure

While the review board also found that Foulds is liable under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act for the $253,667 it cost the BC SPCA to care for the animals, no order of payment was made.

The society is continuing its investigation and no charges have yet been laid.

BC SPCA officers first investigated the property after Princeton RCMP lodged a concern about the animals.

Acting on an anonymous tip, police visited the farm in August and forwarded their observations to the society.

READ MORE: 6 puppies rescued in mass seizure on Princeton farm have died of illness: BC SPCA

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