A microscopic image of cryptosporidiosis in a stool sample. (Pixnio image)

A microscopic image of cryptosporidiosis in a stool sample. (Pixnio image)

Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

More than 12,000 residents affected by the boil water advisory issued Dec. 14

The City of Prince Rupert continues to be under a boil water advisory, and officials expect it to last another week.

On Friday, Dec. 14, more than 12,000 residents were notified that they must boil water for at least one minute until further notice after high levels of giardia and cryptosporidium were found in the city water.

Symptoms

Giardia is a microscopic parasite that can infect the intestines in both humans and animals — also known as ‘beaver fever’. Symptoms include diarrhea, gas, bloating, nausea and fatigue.

Cryptosporidium is also a microscopic parasite that can cause gastrointestinal infections with the most common symptom being watery diarrhea, as well as stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, a mild fever and dehydration. The infection is passed through feces, so people who have diarrhea should not attend work or school, or go to any public facilities such as the pool, where they can pass it on.

Northern Health said the boil water advisory was issued as a precautionary measure, and people should follow the guildelines set out by the City of Prince Rupert.

“The risk of health affects is low, for any questions contact HealthLinkBC or visit a physicians office,” said Eryn Collins, spokesperson with Northern Health.

The number for HealthLink BC is 811, and she said they are prepared to take calls from residents concerned with this particular issue.

HealthLinkBC’s site states that a person can be infected and have no symptoms.

However, symptoms tend to start from two to 10 days after exposure to the parasite, and can last an average of one to two weeks. For people with a weakened immune system, such as young children and seniors, the infection may last longer.

A water testing facility in Prince Rupert continues to monitor the levels of both crypto and giardia.

READ MORE: Boil water notice in effect for Prince Rupert

What to do

Until then, the entire city must boil their water for one minute for everything including washing the dishes, brushing teeth, washing and so on.

In a lengthy post by Mayor Lee Brain, he warns pet owners that they must boil their water, then let it cool, for their pets, and while it’s safe for adults and teens to take showers with untreated water, parents should sponge bath young children.

Prince Rupert resident, Dave Boyle, has three children and he said he’s been busy.

“Just a lot of boiling water. We constantly have a couple of post boiling. I don’t know what the cost of that will be,” he said.

Mayor Brain said that water filtration devices are not safe to use either.

Residents who have been drinking the boiled water say that they don’t like the taste.

“I’m drinking a lot of Powerade and it’s not good for me,” said Mamie Lawson. “Boiling is not as convenient and the tast after you boil it is funny.”

The colour of the water is notably yellow, but this is not unusual. The city’s water comes from an above ground lake and the tannins in the water cause the discolouration.

“Although we understand why the colour can be off-putting, in our case it has more to do with the source, rather than the quality of water,” Brain said.

Upgrades to the city’s water supply have been an ongoing effort by the municipality. Currently, water is being pulled from Shawatlan Lake, the city’s secondary water source, while the principal water source at Woodworth Lake undergoes necessary renovations. The water infrastructure is approximately 100 years old, and the dam is expected to be rebuilt in 2019.

While the city has applied for grant funds to improve its water treatment.

Businesses affected

Due to the advisory, Prince Rupert businesses are experience some setbacks.

At Tim Hortons, assistant manager Mila Johnson said they have to have an extra employee on shift who is solely in charge of boiling water.

“Hand washing policy is unchanged, we just have to pre-boil water before washing our hands in it,” Johnson said.

Tims has also shut down all their iced beverage stations, however they are still serving coffee.

“We double boil our coffee, once in the back to 100 Celsius then we manually add in the pre-boiled water to the coffee machine,” Johnson said.

“We tried to find solutions, but whatever we can’t do manually we shut down.”

How did this happen?

The last boil water notice was more than a decade ago. So how did this all happen? The city is blaming ‘Mother Nature’ — a dry summer followed by the recent storms. This has increased the debris in the water supply, and high levels of cryptosporidium and giardiasis.

Groups with high risks to cryptosporidium include child care workers and parents of infected children, people with lowered immune systems and chronically sick children.

Finding fresh water

While Prince Rupert is under the notice, the District of Port Edward is not. The district has its own water supply and treatment plant.

Chief administrative officer, Bob Payette, said if Prince Rupert residents want to travel to Port Edward to gather water, they can.

Councillor James Brown shared with the Northern View that there is safe free water at the Port Edward RV water tap on Skeena Drive, and for people to bring their own containers.

READ MORE: $16.5M Woodworth Dam replacement project moves forward



shannon.lough@thenorthernview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Prince Rupert is under a boil water advisory for the next week. Residents who want to purchase water will pay up to $49.50 for a flat at some convenience stores. (Nick Laws / The Northern View)

Prince Rupert is under a boil water advisory for the next week. Residents who want to purchase water will pay up to $49.50 for a flat at some convenience stores. (Nick Laws / The Northern View)

Just Posted

Lightning in Kelowna, B.C. (Contributed)
Severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Okanagan

Conditions are favourable for the development of severe thunderstorms overnight

Justin Fotherby,17, and Ashley McMillan, 17 have been chosen for an invitation only competition that sees 20 of Canada’s top swimmers per event vying for a spot at the upcoming 2021 Tokyo Olympic Games. (Submitted)
Penticton swimmers off to Olympic trials

The pair are eyeing a spot on the Canadian team heading to the Tokyo Olympics

Bentley resting on a bench at Kal Park in Vernon not knowing there is a baby rattlesnake curled up below. Bentley jumped down and was bit by the snake. (Facebook)
Dog bit by baby rattler at popular Vernon park

The rattlesnake was hidden underneath a park bench when it struck out

Renderings of what the skating rink could look like beside City Hall between Martin and Main in downtown Penticton. (Activate Penticton image)
Outdoor skating rink back at Penticton council

City staff recommend going forward with rink which could host 2022 BCHL’s 60th year celebration

Longtime SOWINS volunteer Diane Fru (far left) walks with members of her family as they Walk To End Abuse Sunday, June 13, 2021. South Okanagan Women In Needs Society (SOWINS) raised a record amount this year. (Monique Tamminga Western News)
Walk to End Abuse in South Okanagan breaks fundraising record

More than $53,000 raised so far while the pandemic has increased need for SOWINS’ services

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

(Heather Lueck image)
Crash north of Enderby knocks out power, slows Highway 97A traffic

A witness captured footage of a medical helicopter landing at the scene

Most Read