Hedley man advertises bounty on rats

One rat tail will net five dollars

A Hedley man has put a $5 bounty on rats in his community, and is willing to pay $5 for every rat tail he is given.

Several members of the community have complained on social media about a increase in the local rodent population.

The creative resident said he’s only bought one rat tail since he put up a sign advertising the offer, but he is hopeful more people will get out and bring down the critters.

He disposes of rat carcasses by burning them, he said.

Related: The rats have moved in

According to HealthLink BC, only three kinds of rodents create domestic or farmyard problems– the house mouse, Norway rat and black rat.

That service advises the following for getting rid of rodents:

“Rats and mice have babies often, so it is important to find and get rid of them quickly and efficiently.

“Even if you do not see an actual rodent, the size and shape of the droppings can tell you if it is a mouse or rat. It is important to know what pest you are trying to get rid of as there are different control methods for the different rodents.

“Mouse droppings are approximately 6 mm (1/4 inch) long and oval shaped. Roof rat droppings are about 13 mm (1/2 inch) long with pointed ends and Norway rat droppings are about 19mm (3/4 inch) long with blunt ends.

“The best way to get rid of rats or mice is by using traps. If using spring loaded traps for rats, bait three of them in a row without setting them. Bait with dried fruit, peanut butter mixed with oats, or cheese. Set the traps at ‘right angles’ (90 degrees) to the walls where the rodents are known to travel, with the bait side of the trap toward the wall.

When the rodents get use to feeding, set the traps. Make sure the bait is securely attached to the trip pedal so the trap springs when the food is removed.

“Once you capture a rodent, make sure not to touch it with your bare hands.

“Wear gloves when handling a dead rodent and the trap.

“Double bag the dead rat or mouse, seal the bags, and then bury, burn, or place the bags in the trash, according to local bylaws. The trap can be reset if gloves are worn.

“It is not a good idea to use poison or baits to control rodents. Poisoned rodents can crawl away and die, and their bodies can be hard to find and result in unpleasant odors.

“Poisons can also accidentally harm pets, wild animals, or even children.

“Ultrasound repellers, although effective at first, are expensive and do not have long-term success at eliminating rodents. If after taking preventive measures, a rat problem still exists on your property and you want to try rat poison, there are certain things you should consider:

• Set out non-poisoned food for a few days prior to baiting, so the rodent starts feeding in the area.

• Read and follow the directions on the label carefully.

• Set bait in areas where there is no access to children or pets.

• Remove dead rodents and all baits once pest control has been completed.

“If you are unable to control rodents on your own, contact a licensed company with certified staff to help you.”

HealthLinkBC also says homeowners should eliminate food and water supplies, hiding and living places, and pest proof their buildings.

Related: Rats rear their pointy heads around the Interior

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Penticton Western News Publisher Warren Smith takes a look at the 2020 Best of the South Okanagan supplement appearing in today’s (Wednesday, Oct. 21) paper.
Hot off the Press: The Best of the South Okanagan

Check out Wednesday’s Penticton Western News for winners and favourites

File photo
EDITORIAL: The power of a single vote

In the Oct. 24 British Columbia election, every vote is important

RCMP stock photo (Black Press)
Kelowna RCMP investigating unexplained death of cattle

Cattle found dead near gravel road, east of the Kelowna Airport

The Community Foundation of the South Okanagan Similkameen is launching an initiative to provide horse-assisted therapy to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic (Black Press file photo)
Community Foundation of South Okanagan Similkameen to provide horse-assisted therapy

Therapy sessions will be offered to frontline workers during ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry presents modelling of COVID-19 spread in B.C., March 25, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 203 new cases

up to 1,766 active cases in B.C., two more deaths

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

(Kelowna Capital News)
B.C. Labour Board orders Peachland cannabis company to reinstate laid-off employees

The B.C. Labour Relations Board determined the employees were laid off due to their plan to unionize

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
British Columbia man dies during ski trip near glacier west of Calgary

Kananaskis Public Safety and Alpine Helicopters responded around 2:30 p.m.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, following a week-long break for the House of Commons. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
One crisis after another for Trudeau since last federal election one year ago

It has been a year of unprecedented calamity and crisis

Curtis Sagmoen
Public warning issued to North Okanagan sex trade workers

RCMP warns workers to stay away from Salmon River Road area

Two pigs roam the Salmon Arm Walmart parking lot during a prior visit photographed by Danielle Burgi. (Danielle Burgi photo)
Pigs trot over for a visit at Salmon Arm shopping centre

Employees say this was the second drop-in from the temporarily free-range porkers

Penticton law courts. (Black Press file)
Osoyoos man in court for alleged shooting

The Oct. 11 shooting left a man with non-life threatening injuries

Most Read