Electric cars are 80% cheaper to fuel than gas vehicles: BC Hydro

BC Hydro crunched the numbers, and thousands can be saved each year by ditching gas-guzzlers, a report says

Switching from a top-selling gas-powered car to an electric vehicle could save thousands of dollars in commuting costs in B.C., according to BC Hydro.

In its latest report released Friday, the utility said the average driver travels about 20 kilometres each day.

With recent gas prices in the Lower Mainland and Victoria topping $1.70 per litre, it’s no surprise big savings are to be had in going electric, so long as you can afford the higher prices compared to gas-fueled options.

BC Hydro said the Nissan Leaf can cost as low as $2 a week when travelling 140 kilometres.

To take the theory on a test drive, BC Hydro used data from petroleum analysts at GasBuddy.com and compared how much it would cost to drive a Honda Civic, Toyota Rav4, Ford 150 and an electric Nissan Leaf on B.C.’s most common commutes.

GAS PRICES 101: Where B.C. drivers’ pretty pennies are going at the pump

The calculations are based on gas prices across the province on Wednesday.

Driving from Duncan to Victoria on a daily basis, or roughly 122 kilometres, costs as much as $5,516 to fuel a Ford F150 over the span of a year. That’s compared to $3,678 in a Toyota Rav4, $3,218 in a Honda Civic and $624 in a Nissan Leaf.

Savings are shorter trips as well, such as a 15-kilometre drive in Kelowna, where a Nissan Leaf will use $77 worth of power, compared to $358 in a Honda Civic, $426 in a Toyota Rav4 and $613 in a Ford F150.

The utility said that British Columbians are starting to notice the savings, as well as how gas-free cars reduce emissions, with 17,000 of them on the road. Up to 300,000 green-friendly cars are expected by 2030.

Check out the different gas costs calculated for more than a dozen trips through B.C.:

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