Salmon Arm’s Armaan Dhaliwal, aka the Samosa Kid, is donating 25 per cent of his samosa sales in support of Ukraine. (Barb Brouwer photo)

Salmon Arm’s Armaan Dhaliwal, aka the Samosa Kid, is donating 25 per cent of his samosa sales in support of Ukraine. (Barb Brouwer photo)

Salmon Arm’s ‘Samosa Kid’ fundraising for Ukraine

11-year-old entrepreneur inspired by grandparents

By Barb Brouwer

Contributor

Armaan Dhaliwal likes boxing and basketball.

The 11-year-old is also a successful, local entrepreneur known as the Samosa Kid.

The spicy samosas are made in Vancouver by a family friend and shipped frozen to Salmon Arm.

Armaan’s business was born on March 17, 2021 when, on tasting them, family members and friends clamoured for more. And as of April 18, his revenues were already $3,000, which earned him $1,000 in profit.

But Armaan is learning that being an entrepreneur is about a lot more than making money. It is about being grateful and giving back.

This is something the successful entrepreneurs in his family are making sure he understands.

His dad, Sunny Dhaliwal, and grandfather, Gordie Dhaliwal, own City Furniture and his maternal grandfather, Baldave Bath, is a philanthropist and owner of a car dealership in the Lower Mainland.

“Both grandfathers came from India with $7 in their pockets,” says his mother, Prab. “They’re from Third World countries, they know about poverty and they talk to Armaan all the time.”

Less than a month after starting his business last year, Armaan demonstrated his commitment to community by donating $500 from samosa sales to the Shuswap Hospital Foundation.

During Covid, the Grade 6 student raised $5,000 to buy ventilators for India, which was hard hit by the disease.

Concerned for the people of Ukraine, Armaan recently started another fundraiser, donating 25 per cent of his samosa sales in support of that country.

The young entrepreneur uses his cell phone to conduct samosa business, but also to stay abreast of the news.

As of April 11, his Ukrainian fundraiser had realized more than $5,000 and will continue until the end of April.

People are encouraged to help the people of Ukraine by buying samosas, or by donating directly to the United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees, at give.unhcr.ca.

Armaan operates his business after school until 7:30 or 8 p.m. Orders can be made by texting 236-412-9145.

Read more: Salmon Arm boy’s samosa sales benefit hospital foundation


newsroom@saobserver.net
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter


Sign up for our newsletter to get Salmon Arm stories in your inbox every morning.

fundraiserSalmon ArmUkraine

We are experiencing technical difficulties with our commenting platform and hope to be up and running again soon. In the meantime, you can still send us your thoughts on Facebook or Twitter, or submit a letter to the editor.