Students from Harwood Elementary, Mission Hill Elementary and W.L. Seaton Secondary attended the No Stone Left Alone ceremony at Pleasant Valley Cemetary Friday morning. (Brendan Shykora - Morning Star)

Poppies signify remembrance and support

BC/Yukon Command of the Royal Canadian Legion speaks on the significance of the poppy

The start of this year’s poppy campaign and remembrance season is marked by the little red flower adorned on the lapels of citizens.

Leading up to Monday, Nov. 11 poppy campaign volunteers will take part in defining what remembrance means for Canadians everywhere.

“Most Canadians have never sacrificed anything for the freedoms we enjoy. It was given to us by those who came before us. It is now our duty to honour our Veterans and never forget the service and sacrifices they made on our behalf. We also remember…the parents who lost children to war, the dads who never came home, the children and teenagers who grew up far too soon,” said BC/Yukon Command President Val MacGregor.

As both BC/Yukon Command President and a volunteer, MacGregor has the pleasure of participating in the many ways Legion members benefit the local community.

Volunteering for the poppy campaign is a first taste of what those who volunteer at their local legion branch do throughout the year.

“Our volunteers and members are the heart of the Royal Canadian Legion. The range of skills and people needed to operate a branch demand responsibility. Our volunteers go above and beyond,” said John Scott, vice-president and membership chair of the BC/Yukon Command of the Royal Canadian Legion.

There are seven ways poppy campaign volunteerism can lead to benefits for veterans and growing careers

Volunteers have the opportunity to:

1. Speak on remembrance at public and private schools

2. Create gaming and community building events

3. Visit and care for veterans

4. Be on their local branch’s board to give direction on finances and daily operations

5. Have a voice in the future of the Legion and veterans

6. Participate in veteran advocacy efforts

7. Fundraise with poppies to promote remembrance in Canada

The Legion Poppy Campaign raises around $2.5 million per year for services and support in B.C.

The BC/Yukon Legion Foundation gives more than $500,000 a year to support veterans and strengthen communities

The branches in BC/Yukon Command raise $1.2 million/year through gaming which is re-invested in community programs.

For more information and opportunities visit www.legionbcyukon.ca.


@VernonNews
newsroom@vernonmorningstar.com

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