Barclay’s ranch is site of present-day Summerland

Property was purchased by Sir Thomas Shaughnessy in 1902

George Barclay owned and operated the Trout Creek cattle ranch which is today the site of most of present day Summerland.

Barclay arrived in Summerland in 1890 and was one of the first non-Indigenous pioneers to settle in the area.

On Sept. 4, 1897, he married Caroline Cornwall, daughter of the Lieutenant Governor Clement Cornwall.

By 1900, Caroline wished to return to her home at Ashcroft and the ranch was for sale.

Summerland was founded in August, 1902 when Sir Thomas Shaughnessy and his company, the Summerland Syndicate, purchased George Barclay’s Trout Creek Ranch. The Barclay cattle ranch comprised 1,400 hectares. The company later acquired another 200 hectares of government land.

READ ALSO: Camps once housed workers along Kettle Valley Railway

READ ALSO: Palmer worked with apple breeding program in Summerland

Under the direction of Shaughnessy and with the managerial skills of J.M. Robinson, the new Summerland Development Company and the community of Summerland grew.

The Okanagan Electoral District list of “Persons Entitled to Vote” of Nov. 5, 1906 included 443 permanent Christian residences in the Summerland area.

Section 92(8) of Canada’s Constitution Act of 1867 permitted provincial legislative powers over municipal institutions.

With the passage of the Municipal Incorporation Act of 1896 by the British Columbia Provincial Legislature, communities were given the opportunity to incorporate.

Those intending to incorporate required a Letter Patent to apply. The names on the petition had to be residents of the community for six months prior to the petition and the petitioners had to be “not less than 100 male British subjects of full age.” And finally, a significant number of names on the petition had to be a “like proportion of landowners.”

READ ALSO: Tent homes were once used in Summerland

The community of Summerland met the requirements of the Municipal Incorporation Act and Summerland was incorporated, as the municipal seal bears out, on Dec. 21, 1906.

A subsequent municipal election took place on Jan. 14, 1907 when a total of five candidates ran. All five were elected by acclamation.

On Jan. 21, 1907 in the Band Block, in what is now Lowertown, the candidates were officially sworn into office: J. M. Robinson was declared the Reeve and J. C. Ritchie, R.H. Agur, J.R. Brown and C.J. Thomson filed certificates of office as councillors. At this first council meeting, following a ballot vote,

J.L. Logie was given the position as secretary treasurer with a salary of $200 a year.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

history

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Princeton high school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

Bench plaque recognizes former Summerland firefighter

Volunteers with fire department set up plaque in honour of Richard Estabrooks

Princeton RCMP arrest suspects in violent Salmon Arm home invasion

Two men who allegedly staged a violent home invasion in Salmon Arm… Continue reading

Public shows support for alcohol in outdoor spaces: City of Penticton

City council will vote on whether to continue allowing public consumption, on Tuesday, July 7

Interior Health will not expand Police and Crisis Team

Southeast Division Chief Superintendent Brad Haugli asked IH to expand the program

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police searching for missing Lake Country man

David Anthony Jenken, 65, was reported missing Friday and was last seen on June 28

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Seymour Arm landslide interrupts drinking water to 500 people

The July 3 slide damaged a water system and a logging road.

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

White-throated sparrows have changed their tune, B.C. study unveils

Study marks an unprecedented development scientists say has caused them to sit up and take note

Most Read