Wineries, brewers can now sell booze they didn’t make

Cross-promotion between alcohol producers expected to be unleashed with latest B.C. liquor policy reform

Wineries can now serve craft beer in their lounges and breweries are no longer barred from offering wine after the latest provincial liquor policy reform.

Wineries, breweries, cideries and distilleries with licensed lounges can now sell patrons liquor they didn’t produce.

Until now, a distillery couldn’t sell anything other than the spirits it produces – a glass of B.C. wine was off limits – and a winery couldn’t oblige if one guest at a table wanted a beer instead of the local grape.

Those lines are erased under the latest change stemming from B.C.’s liquor policy review.

But there will be a limit – a maximum of 20 per cent of sales by a given producer can consist of liquor produced off-site. That’s intended to keep the focus on unique local offerings.

“We are doing away with B.C.’s archaic liquor rules,” Attorney General Suzanne Anton said, adding the change will give more choice to consumers while supporting B.C. tourism and small businesses.

Craft Distillers Guild of B.C. president Tyler Dyck said the move opens the door for craft brewers, vintners and distillers to cross-promote each other.

The new rules also apply to special events, so a wedding or other event at a winery or other liquor producer will no longer have to get a special occasion licence to serve alcohol.

Anton indicated more reforms may be coming in areas where “further red tape can be cut.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COLUMN: Diminished Parliament means diminished accountability for Canadians

Bloc Quebecois and NDP use resumption of parliament as bargaining chip

Penticton Farmers Market prepares for return

The weekly market was put on-hold for months due to COVID-19

No injuries in Penticton Indian Band structure fire

The structure, which sustained significant damage, was boarded up and seemingly vacant

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Central Okanagan schools ready to welcome students back

Students are set to go back to school next Monday, June 1

Houseboat company partly owned by Shuswap MLA withdraws controversial ad

The ad welcomed houseboaters from other provinces, contradicting anti COVID-19 measures.

Squabble between campers in North Shuswap leads to bear spraying

An argument over late night partying escalated into a fight which led to one person being sprayed

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Penticton may soon allow drinking alcohol in some public places

Trying to inconspicuously drink on the beach could become a thing of the past

VIDEO: Flowers stolen from Vernon distillery

Okanagan Spirits Craft Distillery captured surveillance footage of the thief in a black car

Most Read