Wife and husband duo Alexis Esseltine and Timothy Scoon n took over Penticton’s Tin Whistle Brewing in October, 2020 and are making their mark on the iconic brew-spot by announcing a new look and an environmental focus. (Contributed)

Wife and husband duo Alexis Esseltine and Timothy Scoon n took over Penticton’s Tin Whistle Brewing in October, 2020 and are making their mark on the iconic brew-spot by announcing a new look and an environmental focus. (Contributed)

Penticton’s original brewery goes eco-friendly under new ownership

Tin Whistle Brewing is now one of the first certified carbon neutral breweries in B.C.

Penticton’s original brewery has changed hands and the owners are planning on bringing a new, eco-friendly vibe to the business.

Founded in 1995, Tin Whistle Brewing is the original craft brewery of the South Okanagan.

New owners, wife and husband duo, Alexis Esseltine and Timothy Scoon took over Tin Whistle in October, 2020 after losing their jobs at the onset of the pandemic and are making their mark on the iconic brew-spot by announcing a new look and an environmental focus.

Soon after purchasing the brewery, they relocated their young family to Penticton from the Lower Mainland and got to work renewing the 25-year-old business.

To celebrate Earth Day, Tin Whistle Brewing has announced they are now certified carbon neutral — making them one of the first certified carbon neutral breweries in B.C.

READ MORE: B.C. brewery creates bread beer from food waste

“This is us doing our part to address climate change and reduce global warming,” said Esseltine.

Esseltine is no stranger to the importance of environmentally friendly practices. The former sustainability manager at the Vancouver Aquarium has been recognized as a Clean 50 Emerging Leader for outstanding contributions to sustainable development and clean capitalism in Canada.

“We know beer, like all products, has an impact on the natural world whether it’s through the grains grown and transported to our facilities or the energy, water and waste from production,” she said. “We knew we could make great beer, and we also knew we could lessen our impact.”

While some things may be changing at Tin Whistle, the most important thing: the beer, won’t be, said Scoon.

“We knew the brewery had a loyal following and a solid line up of beers,” said Scoon. “We also knew we could use our combined backgrounds in business, sales, operations and sustainability to update the brand in a way that integrated our passion for our customers, our new home of Penticton, and our environment.”

Traditionally available in 650 ml glass bottles, Tin Whistle beer is now packaged in 473 ml cans— built for enjoying the environment its owners are keen to protect – whether it’s camping, a trip to the beach, or a picnic in the park.

Tin Whistle beers are available in the brewery’s historic Cannery Trade Centre Penticton taproom, where customers can call ahead for contactless delivery or pick-up.

Tin Whistle beers are also available throughout the Okanagan in private liquor stores and restaurants, in B.C. government liquor stores, and in Alberta and Saskatchewan in select liquor stores.

READ MORE: Penticton named one of best beer towns in Canada

READ MORE: Penticton’s Cannery Brewing says cheers to 20 years



jesse.day@pentictonwesternnews.com

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